Sweet Crunch Gets Some National Attention

posted May 2, 2013, 10:18 AM by Staff News & Citizen

by Mickey Smith


   Each month, Sweet Crunch Bake Shop’s Deb Burritt peruses her edition of Bake magazine, an industry specific national trade magazine dedicated to the business end of baking. When her most recent edition came, she received quite a surprise, as her shop and most notably her Maple cookies could be found on page 48.

“Bake” stands for business, accuracy, knowledge and execution.

Burritt said she will often contact the magazine to inquire about stories or ideas she has gleaned from their publication – because of that she has become visible on the magazine’s radar.  About two months ago she was contacted by one of the writers regarding an upcoming issue, which would be dedicated to cookies.  She said the writer asked her a few questions and she sent in a picture of her some of her cookie options and their packaging. That was the last she heard until her April edition came in the mail and included a 400 word article about using a local ingredient to build a signature cookie, in this case Sweet Crunch’s Vermont Maple Cookie.

Burritt said she has received a few calls already from other bakers, including some that like her packaging ideas and wanted some information regarding her sources.  Of course, that’s the only secret about the cookies she would let out.  As the article says, the cookie’s recipe is “a secret that no other employee at the bakery knows the product formula.”

The Maple Cookie is Sweet Crunch’s most popular by far.  She estimates it outsells their other cookies by 6-1. Annually they make about 60,000 cookies, she said 40,000 of those are made in December.  Currently, Burritt is planning an addition to her building to make a dedicated space for cookies in the kitchen.  She said they will be adding an 18’ by 24’ area to square up the back of the building, and Bake magazine is helping her find a machine to automate the cutting of the formation of the cookies.  They’ll still be mixed and baked by hand, but she wants a “cookie depositor” to do the cutting.

This will come in handy, as Burritt said she has recently received an order to start putting her product in the “Best of Boston” store at Faneuil Hall.



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