Lamoille in the News


  • M'town Sidewalk Work Abounds     by Andrew Martin     Plans to upgrade Morristown’s sidewalk system are now underway. On Wednesday, July 15 work began to rebuild the sidewalks on Maple Street as part of the larger project that has been taking place on the street over the past several years. The Maple Street sidewalks are just part of a great deal of sidewalk work that will be taking place all over Morrisville in the coming weeks.     The work to install new sidewalks throughout much of Morrisville is being conducted by contractor Dale Tatro. According to Morristown Town Administrator Dan Lindley the work to install all new sidewalks on Maple Street is expected to be complete in the next couple weeks. Following that work Tatro will ...
    Posted Jul 30, 2015, 8:55 AM by Staff News & Citizen
  • "Trees" Coming To Morrisville?     by Kayla Friedrich    The town of Morristown, River Arts, and MACC (Morristown Alliance for Culture and Commerse) are partnering together to enhance the downtown with the creation of three sculptural trees by a local artist. Back in February, the town applied for an Animating Infrastructure grant, and was awarded $14,450 from the Vermont Arts Council to begin the search for an artist. Now that it has been narrowed down to two finalists, Assistant Professor of Fine Arts at Johnson State College Michael Zebrowski and Hardwick Artist Gordon Auchincloss, the town of Morristown and River Arts are applying for another grant for the creation of the project.     The total art budget for the project will be approximately $40,000, which ...
    Posted Jul 30, 2015, 8:54 AM by Staff News & Citizen
  • Bee’s Knees Still for Sale     by Kayla Friedrich    The Bee’s Knees, a popular café and music venue in Morrisville, has been on the market for nearly a year now, and is still looking for a buyer. The business is currently listed with William Raveis Stowe Realty for $135,000, but the contract expires in August, and it may be listed elsewhere at that time.Sharon Dietz Caroli and her son Manny in front of Morrisville’s Bee’s Knees.  - Friedrich photo    When the restaurant opened in 2003 it brought live music to Morrisville every night, along with local artist’s work on the walls and locally grown food on the table - a tradition that continues today and that Owner Sharon Deitz Caroli hopes will ...
    Posted Jul 30, 2015, 8:53 AM by Staff News & Citizen
  • Community Input Meeting Regarding Johnson Maplefields     by Andrew Martin     The possibility of a new Maplefields in Johnson is looking more like a reality. On Monday, July 13 Skip Vallee of RL Vallee Inc. met with the Johnson Planning Commission and community members at the Johnson Municipal Building to discuss his company’s plans for the site. Vallee and his engineers have been working to ensure that the new gas station, which would be located on the site of the current CH Stearns Mobil on Route 15, fits in with the rest of Johnson and the community vision for Main Street. Along with presenting current plans for the site Vallee was also seeking more community input for the project as he prepares to begin applying for the ...
    Posted Jul 30, 2015, 8:51 AM by Staff News & Citizen
  • Legislators Look Back at Session     by Kayla Friedrich    Several Lamoille County Representatives, including the Speaker of the House, met for a legislative breakfast at the Charlmont Restaurant in Morrisville, Tuesday July 21. On the agenda was discussing successes and shortfalls in the last legislative session. This event wrapped up this year’s series hosted by Lamoille Region Chamber of Commerce.    The breakfast was sponsored by Rich Jacobs, the financial advisor at Edward Jones, and began with each of the representatives discussing their thoughts on what happened during the last legislative session, as well as what they see coming down the line for the next legislative session.     “I think the session was fairly successful,” said Lamoille County Senator Rich Westman, R-Cambridge, “and I think that ...
    Posted Jul 30, 2015, 8:49 AM by Staff News & Citizen
  • Stowe Considers Roundabout     by Kayla Friedrich    The VT Agency of Transportation and the Town of Stowe are currently in discussions about how to improve the intersection of Moscow Road and VT Route 100 in Stowe, as part of the Stowe-Route 100 Reconstruction Project Slated to begin in Spring 2016.     Starting next year, VTrans plans to dig up and redo the roughly 10 miles between Waterbury and Stowe, widening and smoothing out Route 100, working from the ends to the middle.    Concerns have been raised by the community about the idea of installing a traffic light at the Moscow Road intersection, and members of the Town of Stowe have requested that the Agency of Transportation consider putting a roundabout there instead. To do ...
    Posted Jul 30, 2015, 8:48 AM by Staff News & Citizen
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M'town Sidewalk Work Abounds

posted Jul 30, 2015, 8:55 AM by Staff News & Citizen

    by Andrew Martin

    Plans to upgrade Morristown’s sidewalk system are now underway. On Wednesday, July 15 work began to rebuild the sidewalks on Maple Street as part of the larger project that has been taking place on the street over the past several years. The Maple Street sidewalks are just part of a great deal of sidewalk work that will be taking place all over Morrisville in the coming weeks.
    The work to install new sidewalks throughout much of Morrisville is being conducted by contractor Dale Tatro. According to Morristown Town Administrator Dan Lindley the work to install all new sidewalks on Maple Street is expected to be complete in the next couple weeks. Following that work Tatro will be moving on to install new sidewalks on sections of Brooklyn and Park Streets as well. Lindley explained that the town received a grant several years ago that funded the replacement of a great deal of the Park Street sidewalks. The work planned there this year will extend the sidewalk that was installed several years ago up to the village line.
    New sections of sidewalk will also be added on Harrel Street in order to connect with the sidewalks built by the H.A. Manosh Corporation in that area. A small section of sidewalk near the Morristown Police Department will also be redone and a similar small section will be replaced in conjunction with Morrisville Water & Light in front of that utility’s office. All told there will be over half a mile of new sidewalks installed around Morrisville, with between 70 and 75 percent of that new sidewalk being installed on Maple Street. The work is expected to be done sometime in the next month.
    “We are thinking it should be completed sometime in the next two to three weeks,” Lindley stated, “If the weather stays reasonable it shouldn’t take very long.”
    Lindley added that one reason the actual installation of the sidewalks is not expected to take very long is the fact that town workers have already completed a great deal of the necessary prep work for the jobs. In most cases Tatro and his workers simply have to install the forms and pour the concrete to complete the task.
    All of the combined sidewalk work is expected to cost approximately $77,000, with the sidewalk work on Maple Street expected to cost roughly $60,000. Lindley explained that the Maple Street portion of the costs will come out of the larger funding pot for the entire Maple Street project as had been previously planned. The remaining portion of the total cost for the rest of the sidewalk work will come from the reserve fund that was established by the town several years ago for just such a purpose.
    At their Monday, July 20, meeting the Morristown Selectboard voted to broaden the project.  Lindley asked the Board for permission to work with Tatro about including Congress St.  and a section of lower Portland Street near 10 Rail Road St. into the project. Funding for these inclusions would also come from the Reserve Fund.
    Lindley said Tatro had stated he could include additional work at the same rate.  Because the rate was much lower than expected, Lindley told the Board this would be a great time to get some more completed.
    Lindley did not believe that the ongoing sidewalk work should impact traffic to any great degree. The only time any delays could occur would be when the new sections of sidewalk, particularly on Brooklyn Street, are being poured. During those brief periods flaggers will be directing traffic as the work is conducted.

"Trees" Coming To Morrisville?

posted Jul 30, 2015, 8:54 AM by Staff News & Citizen

    by Kayla Friedrich

    The town of Morristown, River Arts, and MACC (Morristown Alliance for Culture and Commerse) are partnering together to enhance the downtown with the creation of three sculptural trees by a local artist. Back in February, the town applied for an Animating Infrastructure grant, and was awarded $14,450 from the Vermont Arts Council to begin the search for an artist. Now that it has been narrowed down to two finalists, Assistant Professor of Fine Arts at Johnson State College Michael Zebrowski and Hardwick Artist Gordon Auchincloss, the town of Morristown and River Arts are applying for another grant for the creation of the project.
    The total art budget for the project will be approximately $40,000, which will include artist’s design fees, drawings, legal fees, insurance coverage, costs of materials, fabrication, shipment, installation, and all other project related expenses.
    A $500 stipend was awarded to each of the four semi-finalists in the first phase, for time spent on proposals, and an $11,000 stipend will be awarded to the artist with the winning proposal to cover all incurred expenses after the effecting of a contract, bringing the total budget for the project to $53,000. The community, at the last music series at the Oxbow, will choose the winning proposal on August 19.
    Eleven artists initially submitted requests for qualifications to work on the project.
    “Part of it was they all had to be Vermont Artists,” said Tricia Follert, the Town of Morristown Community Development Coordinator. “The four [semi-finalists] came in this last Monday, and they had developed and presented their vision of the Animated Infrastructure Sculptural Tree Project. Our selection committee came down and picked two artists. Now, what we are going to do is have a presentation to the community at the last music series where the community can vote. Through MACC, we are going to also put the voting online, and maybe in the paper, so that the whole community can help decide what these trees are, even if they can’t make it to the last music series.”
    Tentative locations for the trees are in front of the Centennial Library, the green space in front of the police department, and in front of the post office. The sculptural trees are designed to serve as an interactive mechanism for engaging dialogue throughout the community, and the tree to be placed in front of the post office will be interactive, with interchangeable components, allowing different community organizations, in coordination with the artist, to curate the leaves or bark with messages they want to get out to the community.
    The interactive tree in front of the post office will be permanent, but the other two will be moved seasonally to different parts of town to renew interest.
    “People, forever, have wanted to see trees downtown on our streets,” said Follert. “They are very expensive to put in, and we are not redoing our streets today or tomorrow, because of cost factor. This was my way, River Arts’ way, and MACC’s way, as a partnership, of bringing trees into our town, bringing art into our community, and it’s going to be a fabulous draw to this community.”
    Dominique Gustin, the Assistant Director of River Arts, has been Follert’s partner at River Arts. She created the request for qualifications for the artists, established a professional package that explained everything the town was looking for from the artists, and will help curate the project once it is finished.
    The whole package for the next grant through National Endowment for the Arts is due on August 10, and Follert, in partnership with Gustin, has just submitted the letter of intent. This next grant the town is applying for is a 50/50 grant, which means they have to come up with a 50 percent match. To finish the project out, the town will most likely be asking for $55,000, and Follert says that the granter may use her time and Gustins time working on the project as part of the in-kind match, as well as local’s installation time.

Bee’s Knees Still for Sale

posted Jul 30, 2015, 8:53 AM by Staff News & Citizen

    by Kayla Friedrich

    The Bee’s Knees, a popular café and music venue in Morrisville, has been on the market for nearly a year now, and is still looking for a buyer. The business is currently listed with William Raveis Stowe Realty for $135,000, but the contract expires in August, and it may be listed elsewhere at that time.

Sharon Dietz Caroli and her son Manny in front of Morrisville’s Bee’s Knees.  - Friedrich photo

    When the restaurant opened in 2003 it brought live music to Morrisville every night, along with local artist’s work on the walls and locally grown food on the table - a tradition that continues today and that Owner Sharon Deitz Caroli hopes will continue with new owners.
    “I think that with all the changes in Morrisville, it’s a good time for somebody who has fresh energy and can bring their own take on it, to take over,” said Deitz Caroli. “We continue to have live music every evening, and it’s still fun. This is still a really great business.”
    Deitz Caroli is trying to get out of the restaurant business, so she can focus more on raising her son, Manny, who has been a regular at the restaurant since he was born four years ago. Currently, she, her husband, Jay Caroli, and their son live in the apartment over the restaurant and own land in Wolcott. Deitz Caroli is a stay-at-home mom, who is also trying to run a business. Jay is a self-employed architect, a job that also takes up a lot of time, and Deitz Caroli said it’s hard to juggle a family.
    During the year that the restaurant has been listed, Deitz Caroli said she has had consistent interest in it, and a couple close calls, but their have been various reasons for why the deals have fallen through.
    Right now, she has decided that she will keep the building as it is a good investment in Morrisville, and she is only selling the restaurant. Deitz Caroli said she wants to be able to support someone who is a chef, or wants to work behind a bar and start his own business, but may not have the money to do it, so she is also entertaining the idea of establishing a short-term partnership with the new owner. She will ease her way out, and the new owner can ease him/herself in, and take over.
    “It’s been listed for a year, so I’m very flexible at this point,” said Deitz Caroli. “One of the things about a business like this is that, for the people it appeals to, it’s a lifestyle, and the kinds of people interested in this lifestyle don’t necessarily have money to buy and invest in a business. So, there has been a sort of mismatch I think. So, I’m looking at ways in which I can try to support somebody who is a chef who’s always wanted to have a business like this, but they don’t have the money. How can I match the two and make it happen?”
    Deitz Caroli doesn’t want to be working at the restaurant every day and raising her son with a cell phone in her hand anymore. She wants to move to their land in Wolcott, maybe bring animals back to the farm, and start raising food again. She is even open to raising food for the restaurant.
    “My main goal is a change in lifestyle, and a simplification of my life,” Deitz Caroli said. “And in whatever way this thing happens, I’m psyched to have it happen.”

Community Input Meeting Regarding Johnson Maplefields

posted Jul 30, 2015, 8:51 AM by Staff News & Citizen

    by Andrew Martin

    The possibility of a new Maplefields in Johnson is looking more like a reality. On Monday, July 13 Skip Vallee of RL Vallee Inc. met with the Johnson Planning Commission and community members at the Johnson Municipal Building to discuss his company’s plans for the site. Vallee and his engineers have been working to ensure that the new gas station, which would be located on the site of the current CH Stearns Mobil on Route 15, fits in with the rest of Johnson and the community vision for Main Street. Along with presenting current plans for the site Vallee was also seeking more community input for the project as he prepares to begin applying for the necessary permits for the project.
    At the meeting Vallee explained that the next major step is to seek an Act 250 permit for the project. Before doing so he was hoping to gather more community input on just what the citizens of Johnson would prefer to see for their Maplefields. The plans that Vallee presented on Monday had already incorporated a number of suggestions gathered from Johnson residents in the past.
    During his presentation Vallee stressed that what was being presented were very preliminary designs the current plans for the site call for the new Maplefields to be located up against the property boundary with the Vermont Studio Center. Members of the studio had expressed in the past the desire to have the building and not the pumps of the new station closest to their building in order to help block sound from the rest of the lot. The five new gas pumps would be located in the middle of the lot, and the diesel pump would be located on the far side of the lot closest to the cemetery. The lot will likely have between 35 and 40 parking spots in total.
    Vallee explained that he and his architects have come up with what they call the “Johnson style” for the new building. The store itself will likely be a long one story building with red siding. In overall appearance the store would look much like the recently opened Maplefields in Newport. However, Vallee explained that zoning requirements in Newport necessitated that building being two stories, which proved very costly and resulted in a great deal of unused space. For that reason the Johnson station will likely remain one story with a cupola. Vallee stated that at this time what type of restaurant will go into the new store is still undecided. It will either be an Amato’s or the similar food provider run by R.L. Vallee.
    According to Vallee there are no plans to substantially change the existing curb cuts for the Mobil. He also added that only three truck parking spots will likely be installed on the lot. Current plans by R.L Vallee Inc. call for the creation of a larger truck parking area at the Maplefields in Morrisville. The extensive tree coverage around the side and back of the lot would remain in place.
    Residents of Johnson present at the meeting on Monday expressed strong support for a building similar to the Newport store. However, one issue raised was the desire for even more pedestrian access to the store. As part of that desire the possibility of moving the store even closer to Route 15 and thereby bringing the frontage of the building in line with other structures on Main Street was raised. Vallee stated that while this would result in the loss of between five and six parking spaces he and his engineers would consider the possibility.
    “We are willing to try to move the building forward,” Vallee stated at the meeting, “We can try to find the parking spots elsewhere.”
    During the discussion following Vallee’s presentation the possibility of sending Skip and his architects a copy of the Form Based Code that Johnson officials have been working on for consideration by voters was also raised. It was thought that this draft code would give Vallee an even better idea of the community’s vision for Johnson Village. Both the Johnson Planning Commission and community members in attendance expressed thanks and appreciation for Vallee’s willingness to work with the town on the project to ensure that the new gas station fits in with the rest of the village.
    “There were some very insightful thoughts and ideas shared at the meeting,” Vallee stated in a phone interview with the News & Citizen, “The people of Johnson are trying to create a concept and vision for the development of the downtown area and we are going to try to accommodate those interests wherever we can.”
    The possibility of the gas station lot serving as a pickup and drop off point for public transportation was also raised by Planning Commission chair David Butler during the meeting.
    “We want to encourage the use of public transportation,” Butler stated. While Vallee seemed amendable to the idea of his lot serving as a bus station he did state that it was unlikely that commuters could park their vehicles on the site due to the lack of additional parking spaces.
    Now that he has received more community input Vallee plans to have his engineers and architects complete and finalize the redesign of the new Maplefields.
    “Next in the process for us is redesigning the plan in order to accommodate as many of the requests of the planning commission and public as possible,” Vallee explained.
    “Once that redesign is complete we will be submitting an application for an Act 250 permit,” he continued, adding that he hopes to have the redesign completed as soon as possible.
    “This is a high priority for us, we should have it off fairly soon,” he added. While he conceded that the Act 250 process can be lengthy, Vallee ultimately hopes that construction on the project can begin next year.

Legislators Look Back at Session

posted Jul 30, 2015, 8:49 AM by Staff News & Citizen

    by Kayla Friedrich

    Several Lamoille County Representatives, including the Speaker of the House, met for a legislative breakfast at the Charlmont Restaurant in Morrisville, Tuesday July 21. On the agenda was discussing successes and shortfalls in the last legislative session. This event wrapped up this year’s series hosted by Lamoille Region Chamber of Commerce.
    The breakfast was sponsored by Rich Jacobs, the financial advisor at Edward Jones, and began with each of the representatives discussing their thoughts on what happened during the last legislative session, as well as what they see coming down the line for the next legislative session.
    “I think the session was fairly successful,” said Lamoille County Senator Rich Westman, R-Cambridge, “and I think that we have moved in some direction to solve the budget problems, but I think we are on a cycle here. Those budget problems are recurring, and some of it is our own doing, and some of it is our relationship changing with the federal government.”
    The budget gap was brought up multiple times throughout the breakfast as one of the recurring themes in the legislative session this year. Representative Heidi Scheuermann, R-Stowe, said that she couldn’t remember a year since she’s been in office that there wasn’t a budget deficit.
    “I’m just going to quickly touch on some disappointments,” said Scheuermann. “We started with a $113 million budget deficit, or went to $113 million after it started at $94, and this has become the new normal. I actually don’t remember a year in my years as a representative in Montpelier that we haven’t had a significant budget deficit.”
    According to Scheuermann, a huge portion of the deficit was the stock market crash in 2008, but she believes the current deficit was preventable, and that legislators have yet to address the structural issues with state spending.
    Other issues that were brought up comprised cleaning up water systems (Lake Champlain in particular), addressing energy costs, education funding, the Economic Development bill, and the Vermont Health Connect system, which still isn’t working correctly.
    Along with Scheuermann and Westman, panelists also included Democratic Speaker of the House Shap Smith, Eden Rep. Mark Higley, R-Lowell, Rep. Bernard Juskiewicz, R-Cambridge, and Rep. Avram Patt, D-Worcester.
    Not everyone is going to agree on how to face issues or how to solve the budget problems, and Smith just wanted to emphasize that, “overall almost every single bill that we passed this year that was a major bill, passed with republican, progressive, and democratic support. The story often is about the conflict, because that’s what’s interesting, but often is not about areas where we come together to solve problems.”

Stowe Considers Roundabout

posted Jul 30, 2015, 8:48 AM by Staff News & Citizen

    by Kayla Friedrich

    The VT Agency of Transportation and the Town of Stowe are currently in discussions about how to improve the intersection of Moscow Road and VT Route 100 in Stowe, as part of the Stowe-Route 100 Reconstruction Project Slated to begin in Spring 2016.
    Starting next year, VTrans plans to dig up and redo the roughly 10 miles between Waterbury and Stowe, widening and smoothing out Route 100, working from the ends to the middle.
    Concerns have been raised by the community about the idea of installing a traffic light at the Moscow Road intersection, and members of the Town of Stowe have requested that the Agency of Transportation consider putting a roundabout there instead. To do this, they would need to obtain the required rights of way from property owners, as well as the funds to design and build the structure. Also under consideration are adding designated turn lanes at the intersection.
    “We would like to express our strong support, in general, for the installation of a roundabout in this location,” said State Representative of Stowe, Heidi Scheuermann and State Senator of Lamoille County Rich Westman in a letter to Secretary of Transportation Sue Minter. “This is a critical time in our community, and one for which thoughtful planning is necessary.”
    According to Scheuermann and Westman, it is critical to ensure the safety of the Moscow Road-Route 100 intersection, and the Town of Stowe and Agency of Transportation must do so in a way that would welcome visitors and residents, which is what a roundabout would do, as evidenced by the construction of the roundabout in Waterbury.
    “To be clear, it’s not unanimous by any means, I’m sure,” said Scheuermann. “But our hope is that they address the intersection when they rebuild the road, and that the roundabout is the direction they decide to go if they do something.”

Theatre Review – CATS

posted Jul 30, 2015, 8:47 AM by Staff News & Citizen

    by Mickey Smith

    I have always been under the impression it takes owning three or more cats to be eligible for consideration as a crazy cat person.  With that being said, I found myself wondering what that says of Lamoille County Players Director Patty Jacob who took charge of nearly 30 felines for the Players summer performance of CATS.
    CATS was considered a bold undertaking for a small community theatre like the Lamoille County Players, but they certainly struck gold with this performance.  While the traditional acting and singing expectations were reached, they also mined talent from the local dance community and showcased some talented performers with moves that purrfectly mimicked the moves of a cat.
    For those unfamiliar with the show, CATS doesn't flow like a typical play.  The show comes from the poetry of T.S. Eliot with each vignette being comprised of a different poem.  In her introduction to the show, Jacob described it best when she told the audience to consider each scene a new poem in a book of poetry.
    With that bit of advice, the show does have its own flow as each scene is an opportunity to introduce another character of the cast... thus giving many cast members a chance to shine under the spotlight.
    As much as the onstage talents made for a solid show, the talents needed backstage, namely costuming and makeup, were the backbone of the show and transformed the cast into felines.
    Cast member Heather Manning headed up a strong crew of people who spent a couple hours before each show making sure whiskers and ears were in the right place and that the makeup could be seen from around the Hyde Park Opera House.
    With just one set, the stage crew could make sure they had a fun play area fitting for a group of cats.  Just like your cats at home, the CATS cast enjoyed many levels on which they could prance and frolic or even just lie around if the moment struck them. Best of all you couldn’t even detect a whiff of the litter box.
    CATS is a unique show for the Lamoille County Players, but proves they can step out of their comfort zone and still provide the level of entertainment expected in the Hyde Park Opera House.
    On a side note, I watched the show from the balcony.  The first time I had sat upstairs since the air conditioning was installed.  With the AC units a little closer to you on the second floor, that may be the new place to sit on a hot and steamy night in Hyde Park.
    CATs runs one more week at the Hyde Park Opera House with shows on Thursday, Friday and Saturday night, July 30, 31 and August 1, at 7 p.m. and a matinee at 2 p.m. on Sunday, August 2. For ticket information call 888-4507 or visit their website at www.lcplayers.com.

Renovations Begin at Lamoille County Court House

posted Jul 30, 2015, 8:39 AM by Staff News & Citizen

    by Kayla Friedrich

    Built in 1912, the Lamoille County Courthouse is in dire need of modernization, and since the turn of the 21st century, Lamoille County has been pushing for some major upgrades to the Hyde Park building.

President of ECI Pierre LeBlanc, Michael Obuchowski, commissioner of VT Dept. of Buildings and General Services (BGS), Senator Rich Westman, Speaker of the House Representative Shap Smith, Governor Peter Shumlin, Side Judge Karen Bradley, Associate Judge of the Supreme Court John Dooley, Rep. Linda Martin, and Tricia Harper, project manager for BGS. don hard hats, pick up shovels, and move a little dirt to signify the beginning of the much awaited Lamoille County Court House renovation project.
- Friedrich photo


    After over a decade of lobbying, the state has provided the money to allow for those changes to happen.
    “I’ve got to say, we would not be here without Shap Smith, Linda Martin, and Rich Westman,” said Governor Peter Shumlin at the ground-breaking ceremony on Tuesday, July 14, 2015. “They were like dogs on a bone with this one.”
    Shumlin says these renovations will bring this courthouse, justice, and this community into the 21st century. The project will almost double the space in the building.  Although it won't increase any courtroom space, it will relieve overcrowding, improve security, and address ADA requirements, making it more handicapped accessible. It will also add about 8000 sq. ft. of office space to the building to put staff closer together and improve functionality. It will also add a holding cell.
    Engleberth Construction Inc. (ECI) started the work a month ago, with the project’s estimated cost at $9 million, but the actual cost is suspected to be much lower than that. ECI submitted a $6.7 million bid for the job, and $1 million from a previous appropriation, and other state and local sources will increase the $5.2 million in state money.
    “We try to hire as many local crews as we can,” said Shumlin, “and next May we’ll be here to cut the ribbon.”
    On this project, there are 32 Vermont subcontractors and vendors, and 150 of ECI’s workers will be working through the site and providing help.
    Once the money was approved, the side judges, prosecutors, and court staff had to pick up everything, and move to a temporary location at the old Plaza Hotel in Morrisville, which was renovated to accommodate their yearlong stay.
    Assistant Judge of Lamoille County Court Karen Bradley said to Court Administrator Kathleen Hobart, “you packed up 100 years of files, and got us situated in a space that works.”
    Tuesday was a day for state representatives, and everyone who pushed for these renovations to speak on the project, and thank everyone who made it happen, and for Shumlin, Bradley, Representative Shap Smith, Senator Rich Westman, Associate Judge of the Supreme Court John Dooley, Rep. Linda Martin, Michael Obuchowski, and President of ECI Pierre LeBlanc to put on hard hats, pick up shovels, and move a little dirt to signify the beginning of the much awaited project.
    Dooley says the Supreme Court first identified this project back in 2000, and it became a high priority of theirs in 2006.
    “$8 million is a very large chunk of what the state appropriates in any given year for a capital project, and so being able to do this is not a surprise. It took a number of years to develop the resources, plans, and all of that,” said Dooley. “And it involved a lot of persistence over time to get where we are.”
    Dooley believes that the main purpose of the renovations to the courthouse is to modernize the building to address security concerns and help the staff move cases through the system faster, but also to address needs of the jurors. In the current building, jurors don’t have adequate space to assemble, and sometimes find themselves in the same space as the litigant. According to Dooley, the court system doesn’t always treat jurors right, but these renovations will address some of those issues.
    “I’d like to say this is truly a collaborative project for all of us,” said Bradley, “and I’d like to thank everyone who has worked so hard to make this a reality. When I started 9 years ago with David Williams, we started looking at plans to expand the courthouse, and every year asked for money to get those plans implemented. Finally, through hard work, and David’s tenacity… we are able to do it. On behalf of the county, I thank all of you for making this happen.”



This Week's Photos

Lindgren Retires as Eden Central Principal

posted Jul 23, 2015, 11:37 AM by Staff News & Citizen

    by Andrew Martin

    Eden Central School (ECS) will soon be under new direction. On Tuesday, June 30 former Principal Jeff Lindgren submitted a letter of resignation effective immediately. The Eden School Board officially accepted the letter at their meeting on July 2. Lindgren had been the principal at Eden for the past eight years.
    “It is with deep emotions that I write to you today and announce that I am retiring as a principal at the Eden Central School,” Lindgren wrote in his resignation letter.
    “I feel it is time to experience different things in my life,” Lindgren added in an interview with the News & Citizen. He went on to explain that he would like to spend much more time with his family moving forward. Both of his parents are in their 90’s and he would like to spend more time with them and the rest of his family, including his grandchildren.
    “I originally planned to retire at 60, and I am older than that now,” he added. In his resignation letter Lindgren also explained that the recent passing of his wife and several other events have made him realize how short life can be and has led to him making the decision to begin a new chapter in his life.
    He also said he feels that he is leaving Eden Central School in a good place.
    “The school is in a solid financial situation and with the bond passing recently the internal structure of the building will be more efficient and safe for everyone who uses the facility,” Lindgren stated in his letter.
    He also highlighted the behavioral management system that he and the staff have implemented at ECS as another positive at the school, while also stressing how deeply the staff and administration care about the students there.
    “It’s a good time to retire and move on to do something different,” he stated in his interview, “I want to thank the community for eight wonderful years… they have been very supportive.”
    “It has been an honor to be the principal at Eden Central School,” Lindgren stated in the conclusion of his letter, “I thank the community members and parents for supporting me the last eight years in my endeavor to provide the best quality education possible for all our students.”
    “We are sad to see Jeff go,” Eden School Board Chair Jeff Hunsberger stated, “He has done a wonderful job in his eight years as principal. We wish him the best.”
    “We appreciate that Jeff has served the community and students at Eden Central School well over the last eight years,” Lamoille North Supervisory Union Superintendent Edith Beatty stated. According to Beatty a ceremony honoring Lindgren and his late wife Audrey will be held at Eden Central School in late August or September.


Ciccolo In Interim

    by Andrew Martin

    The Eden School Board and staff at Lamoille North Supervisory Union (LNSU) wasted little time in deciding on a path forward following Principal Lindgren’s retirement. On Thursday, July 16 the three-member school board approved former LNSU Superintendent Joe Ciccolo as the Interim Principal at Eden Central School. Ciccolo will officially assume his duties on August 17.
    “There aren’t many opportunities out there that would make me want to get back into the field,” stated Ciccolo in an interview with the News & Citizen, “Eden has a special spot in my heart though and is one of those opportunities.”
    "We know Joe is a great fit due to his past experience with our staff and administration during his time as superintendent,” Eden School Board Chair Jeff Hunsberger stated, “He provided a great deal of leadership and has a great connection with our staff and teachers. We all have a great relationship with him.”
    “Joe has made the commitment to be on site and help our faculty through this transition period while we work towards hiring the next fulltime principal,” Hunsberger added.
    “I’ve got a great relationship with the community and the school,” Ciccolo explained, “This is a great opportunity for me to be back involved directly at the school level. There is a great staff at Eden and they can do great things. I’m just the person who will be helping them get to that next level as they prepare for their next long-term principal.”
    According to LNSU Superintendent Edith Beatty the decision to go with an interim principal at ECS was made shortly after former Principal Lindgren retired.
    “It is important for the school and community to have time to do a thorough search,” Beatty explained. Such a search would not have been possible in the short amount of time remaining before school begins again, so the decision to hire Ciccolo as interim principal was made.
    “Joe is the best person for the job,” Beatty added with regards to Ciccolo serving in the interim position, “He has a wealth of experience and knows Eden and the rest of the supervisory union.”
    “There has been widespread support for the hire, and Joe has lots of ideas for the next year on how to make Eden even more of a community school,” she added. According to Beatty the search for the next long-term principal at ECS will begin during the 2015-2016 school year with that new individual taking over in July of 2016. 

House Struck by Bullet

posted Jul 23, 2015, 11:35 AM by Staff News & Citizen

    A home on Lazy Lane in Morristown was struck by a bullet on Wednesday, July 8. The Morristown Police Department was notified of the incident at approximately 12:30 p.m.
    According to the owner of the home three gunshots were heard at roughly 12:30 p.m. At the same time they heard the sound of something striking their home and after investigating the noise the homeowner discovered a bullet hole.
    With the aid of the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department investigating officers from the Morristown Police Department were able to ascertain that the bullet was likely fired from somewhere near the intersection of Vermont Route 12 and Tjader Road in Elmore. The Morristown Police Department is continuing to investigate the case and would like to hear from anyone who may have seen someone shooting during the day on July 8 or from anyone who may have fired a weapon during that time period.
    Anyone with any information is asked to call the Morristown Police Department at 888-4211.

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